New Legislation Seeks To Replace Andrew Jackson on $20 Bill

You won’t guess who this senator wants to replace Jackson with.  

jackson-portrait

Oklahoma Senator James Lankford (R) recently introduced legislation that would replace the portrait of Andrew Jackson from the 20 dollar bill with a woman according to a 2/1 report by The New American. 

In a move that will surely be embraced by the politically correct brigade, Lankford explained that Andrew Jackson should be “first in line” to be replaced as opposed to Alexander Hamiltion, who the Treasury Department had previously considered removing from the ten dollar bill.

Lankford cited Jackson’s treatment of Native Americans as the main reason for his legislation which states the following:

“Forced removal by Andrew Jackson of American Indians and the subsequent inhumane settlement of Indians lands represent a major blight on the proud history of the United States.” Source

Republican congressman Tome Cole said he supports the bill but later admitted that he has a “very prejudiced view” of Jackson.

The New American report also addressed a common misconception about the resettlement of Indians:

The Oklahoman article, written by their Washington Bureau’s Chris Casteel, said that “Jackson ordered the removal of the Chickasaws and other Indian tribes from their longtime homes in southern U.S. states to Indian Territory, what would later become Oklahoma.”

This action is certainly deplorable, but it should be noted that Jackson did not act in the manner of many recent U.S. presidents, particularly Barack Obama, and issue executive orders, without supporting legislation from Congress, as one might infer from the story. Congress passed the Indian Resettlement Act in 1830, which authorized the executive branch to negotiate with various Indian tribes to sell their land and receive lands in exchange in Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River. The treaties eventually signed with the various tribal governments were ratified by the U.S. Senate, with overwhelming support of the American public.

Anyone studying the history of the negotiations and subsequent removals of the Indian tribes would conclude that it was obvious the U.S. government was not going to take no for an answer. While the removals were technically effected following the signing and ratification of treaties, they were hardly something the Indians desired. Source

It should be noted that the Federal Reserve once couldn’t account for 9 trillion dollars worth of spending and yet political leaders in America are wasting time on legislation designed only to appeal to Social Justice Warriors.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul’s Audit The Fed bill recently failed to pass by a slim margin and could have helped get the nation’s central bank under control.  In response, Senator Lankford isn’t re-introducing the bill nor is he even perpetuating dialogue about an issue that could greatly impact America’s financial outlook – he’s instead started a congressional debate over whether or not a woman should grace a twenty.

You can read more about this here.

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About the Author

Benjamin Knight
Benjamin Knight, the founder of We the Vigilant and host of The Maverick Podcast, was born in Engelwood, New Jersey. He is a Bible believing Christian, a right-wing Libertarian and a nationalist who is dedicated to fighting back against cultural Marxism and globalism. In his free time, Knight enjoys triggering leftists, shooting guns and being an American.
  • oldgringo

    I enjoy looking at the pictures on postage stamps…especially the ones with cartoon figures on them…folks my age (70’s) remember very well those cartoon figures…therefore my choice of a female on a twenty dollar bill would be Minny Mouse…However I have no objection of Andrew Jackson being on this bill remembering he and his army of irregulars kicked the British out of New Orleans…never did they return…”In 1814 we took a little trip along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip…we took a lot of bacon and we ate a lot of beans as we headed for the British in the town of New Orleans.”…tune…some thing like that.